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Prevent cervical cancer

15.12.2021

Worldwide, one woman dies every two minutes from cervical cancer, a largely preventable cancer today. Together with local partners, the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine of the University of Bern, SolidarMed has therefore implemented a prevention project with HIV-positive women at Chiúre Hospital in Mozambique.

Thanks to your support, weakened health systems in southern and eastern Africa can be strengthened.

99 percent of diseases are caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). The virus is very widespread and is transmitted
transmitted mainly through sexual contact. Effective vaccination protects against infection. In Switzerland, HPV vaccinations are part of the national vaccination schedule for male and female adolescents. In addition, gynecological screening and treatment can prevent serious cancers in early stages. The situation in sub-Saharan Africa is different. 19 of the 20 countries with the most cervical cancer cases worldwide are in this region. In Mozambique, the Ministry of Health has made the fight against cervical cancer a priority, partly because HIV-positive women are at higher risk of developing the disease. In Mozambique, more than 13 percent of the population is HIV-positive.

Your donation makes a difference.

Thanks to your support, weakened health systems in southern and eastern Africa can be strengthened.

SolidarMed, together with local partners, the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine of the University of Bern, conducted a prevention project with HIV-positive women receiving antiretroviral treatment at Chiúre Hospital. 91.9 percent of HIV-positive women consented to cervical screening. This is a remarkable success: previously, only 15.5 percent were reached within the same target group. The key lies in the care and information provided to the women. SolidarMed recruited and trained a health worker for the HIV clinic, who counsels and accompanies the patients.

SolidarMed also supported the establishment of a gynecological examination room, which contributed to an increase in examinations
has occurred. Cancer was successfully treated in 84 percent of women who presented with cervical disease. SolidarMed will continue to advocate for women's health in rural Mozambique. This is because HPV screening is not yet standard practice. Dialogue with health authorities remains important. SolidarMed plans to expand the project to Zimbabwe and Tanzania.